Tag Archives: call for papers

CFP Identity Technologies

Book Collection: Identity Technologies: producing online selves
Deadline: June 15, 2010

The popularity of social networking sites, user-generated content, wireless technologies and games has engendered a rapid proliferation of identities and ways to imagine, produce and consume them. As a result, the internet has become central to how many of its users understand intimacy, communication and community. We contend that this phenomenon is nothing new. Online and offline forms of identity have the potential to act genealogically, challenging our ideas about utopian approaches to the internet as a place without history, bodies or politics.

How then can we understand what identity means online and why it is so important to so many internet users that they have a digital existence? For us, answers to this question do not have to take the form of utopian ideas about internet identities, time and space, but should admit that issues about internet identity are inevitably embedded in concerns about the production of discourse and about the material conditions of internet access, surveillance and use.

In this essay collection, we hope to gather together investigations into a whole host of questions raised by the popularity and power of identity technologies. What kinds of selves are generated online? How do memory and narrative, key elements of autobiography, exist and persist in various forms of online subjectivity? How is identity related to virtual time and space? How do we account for the role of recreation and entertainment in communicating an online self? How do we describe and analyze the relationship between hardware and software design and the identities they occasion and transmit? Is it possible to resist the hail of ITs (internet technologies)? What is the relationship between identity politics and ITs? We aim to bring together emerging ideas about identity and online life from the fields of cultural studies, new media studies and auto/biography studies in order to explore what online identity is and what it might mean.

Please submit a completed essay by June 15, 2010. Essays must be 4000-6000 words in Chicago B style with 12-point font. Essays must be written in English, but they do not have to be about the anglophone, western version of the internet. The collection will be published in digital and paper form with a university press. They welcome submissions which include–but are not limited to–the following topics:

theorizing online identity
questions of pedagogy
research methods
youth cultures and emerging identities

The popularity of social networking sites, user-generated content, wireless technologies and games has engendered a rapid proliferation of identities and ways to imagine, produce and consume them. As a result, the internet has become central to how many of its users understand intimacy, communication and community. We contend that this phenomenon is nothing new. Online and offline forms of identity have the potential to act genealogically, challenging our ideas about utopian approaches to the internet as a place without history, bodies or politics.

How then can we understand what identity means online and why it is so important to so many internet users that they have a digital existence? For us, answers to this question do not have to take the form of utopian ideas about internet identities, time and space, but should admit that issues about internet identity are inevitably embedded in concerns about the production of discourse and about the material conditions of internet access, surveillance and use.

In this essay collection, we hope to gather together investigations into a whole host of questions raised by the popularity and power of identity technologies. What kinds of selves are generated online? How do memory and narrative, key elements of autobiography, exist and persist in various forms of online subjectivity? How is identity related to virtual time and space? How do we account for the role of recreation and entertainment in communicating an online self? How do we describe and analyze the relationship between hardware and software design and the identities they occasion and transmit? Is it possible to resist the hail of ITs (internet technologies)? What is the relationship between identity politics and ITs? We aim to bring together emerging ideas about identity and online life from the fields of cultural studies, new media studies and auto/biography studies in order to explore what online identity is and what it might mean.

Please submit a completed essay by June 15, 2010. Essays must be 4000-6000 words in Chicago B style with 12-point font. Essays must be written in English, but they do not have to be about the anglophone, western version of the internet. The collection will be published in digital and paper form with a university press.

 We welcome submissions which include–but are not limited to–the following topics:


theorizing online identity
questions of pedagogy
research methods
youth cultures and emerging identities
social networking
virtual lives
online desires
collaboration
biography and technology
work
shopping
hardware and software
publicity and privacy
regulation
identity theft
personal video
cyberbodies and cyberspaces
avatars
internet surveillance
archives
viruses and “going viral”
deception and authenticity
activism

Send a copy of your submission as an electronic attachment to both:
Anna Poletti, Charles Sturt University apoletti@csu.edu.au
Julie Rak, University of Alberta julie.rak@ualberta.ca

Source: http://www.ecrea.eu

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Workshop on Art and Social Change – Call for papers

‘Beauty will save the world’: An Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Workshop
on Art and Social Change, University of Bristol, 7-8 September 2010

Hosted by the Department of Politics and sponsored by the Institute for
Advanced Studies and the Global Insecurities Centre, University of Bristol

How does art construct, resist and contest dominant identities and
social practices? How does art open up possibilities for (re)creating
the world? What are the relationships between art, aesthetics, and
politics? What are the power relations involved in art? Whose art, and
whose values are best placed to change the world? Can engaging with art
help us develop new epistemologies and research methodologies? Can
beauty ‘save’ the world?

This two-day interdisciplinary postgraduate workshop is premised on the
assumption that art actively constructs social ‘reality’, as opposed to
merely reflecting it. Against dominant pronouncements privileging the
centrality of rationalism and science as the legitimate avenues towards
knowledge and social change, this workshop poses the question: what does
the ‘serious’ pursuit of ‘progress’ miss out on when it disqualifies the
artist’s imaginary as superfluous, lacking impact, unimportant?

The workshop aims to bring together postgraduate students working in and
across various disciplines to share research which looks at the
contested meanings of art and aesthetics, explores art in different
cultural and historical settings, and examines the ways in which art and
its constructions of beauty, society, politics can help in
understanding, and changing, the social world. The workshop will also
enable postgraduate students to engage and network with more established
scholars, who will be present at the workshop as keynote speakers, panel
chairs and roundtable discussants.

Paper and panel proposals are welcome(2-3 presenters per panel) which
engage specifically with the theme of art and social change, from
various disciplines, including but not limited to: Archaeology,
Anthropology, Classics, English, Modern Languages, History, History of
Art, Visual and Performing Arts, Cultural Studies, Geography,
Philosophy, Sociology and Politics.

Papers can include think pieces or works in progress. We encourage a
diversity of presentation styles, from ‘traditional’ papers to
interactive sessions, involving short film screenings, musical and
dramatic performances, and the display of paintings, sculpture,
photographs, and installation art. Presenters will be assigned a
30-minute slot for their presentation, which can be used by the
presenter as they wish, but must include at least 5 minutes for audience
questions.

For more information, or to email abstracts (maximum 300 words) of
proposed presentations, please contact Cerelia Athanasiou
(cerelia.athanasiou@bristol.ac.uk<mailto:cerelia.athanasiou@bristol.ac.uk>) and Shaira Kadir
(shaira.kadir@bristol.ac.uk<mailto:shaira.kadir@bristol.ac.uk>) by 31 May 2010.

Source: http://www.ecrea.eu

CFP: “Rewriting, Remixing, and Reloading: Adaptations across the Globe”

International Conference
“Rewriting, Remixing, and Reloading: Adaptations across the Globe”
Centre for British Studies, Berlin, 30 September to 1 October, 2010

Call for Papers and Panels

Convenors: Pascal Nicklas (Humboldt University Berlin),
Gesa Stedman (GBZ Berlin), Eckart Voigts-Virchow (Siegen University)

The Centre for British Studies, Berlin (Großbritannienzentrum) will host an international conference on “Rewriting, Remixing, and Reloading: Adaptations across the Globe”, in co-operation with the Association of Adaptation Studies and the Centre of Adaptations, De Montfort University, Leicester.
http://www.literatureonscreen.com/

Translation, transformation, appropriation, assimilation, adaptation – these processes of inter­textual and intermedial contact have been part and parcel of aesthetic activities since their very beginnings. For some time now, the academic sub-discipline of ‘Adaptation Studies’ has been active in exploring adaptive processes, but we feel that the impact of a global reservoir of images as well as the need to articulate cultural and aesthetic specificity in a climate of universal access have yet to make their full impact on adaptation studies. We would like to bring into narrow focus the various aesthetic processes and cultural issues at stake in adapting texts in a globalized world – responding both to the pressure of actualizing texts for a specific cultural moment and to the increasing globalization of cultures. We specifically seek to address media – from film and television to social media and platforms such as youtube – that tend to erase borders and barriers both of a temporal and geographical nature. We are looking forward both to programmatic and theoretical overviews and to significant case studies from this ubiquity of rewriting, remixing and reloading across media and genres. There are no restrictions on issues we would like to address, but proposals in the following areas are encouraged:

*       Theoretical perspectives and keywords in adaptation studies: adaptation, intertextuality, intermediality, remediation, translation, appropriation, re-writing, remixing, reloading.

*       Genres of adaptation: fantasy, Gothic, horror, science fiction, western, crime, romcom, teen movies, etc.

*       Adaptation and the canon.

*       Intercultural adaptation and assimilation: globalizing the ‘Anglosphere’.

*       Adapting nations, cultures and ethnicities.

*       Teaching adaptation across the globe.

*       The role of translation in adaptation studies.

*       Post-literary adaptation: cartoons, games, oral narratives.

*       Adaptation and performance.

*       Audiences of adaptation.

*       Locations of adaptation: film, television. Web 2.0, YouTube and social media.

*       Screens and sounds: adaptation, audiobooks and music.

*       Dressing up adaptations: costumes and mise-en-scène.

*       Adaptation and the stage: plays, theatre, performance.

*       Confrontational adaptation: mash-ups and trailer edits.

*       Cult adaptations and the cult of adaptation.

*       Actualizing the classics: myths, antiquity, Shakespeare, etc.

*       The auteurs of adaptation.

*       Adapting authors: literary bio-pics.

*       “Now a major motion picture” – marketing adaptation.

*       Adapting trauma and catastrophe.

*       Heritage and history in performance on stage and screen.

*       Remaking and rehashing: iterating, re-making and re-presenting film history on screen.

*       Adaptation industries: Hollywood, Bollywood, Europe.

*       Adaptation and gender: Masculinity, femininity, queerings.

*       Adapting fiction and non-fiction, documentary formats.

*       Adaptation and re-writing: Novels, novelizations, screenplays, storyboards.

*       Adaptation, parody, pastiche.

*       Metadaptation: Self-reflexive adaptations.

Abstracts:

200-word abstracts of suggested papers (20 minutes) plus short biographical note should be sent by June 1, 2010, to Prof. Dr. Eckart Voigts-Virchow; e-mail: voigts-virchow@anglistik.uni-siegen.de

Only paid-up members of AAS are eligible to give papers at this conference. Membership subscriptions may be taken out during the conference.

SECOND CALL for papers & presentations 11th Journal of Media Practice Symposium ‘Media and Imagination’

Lincoln School of Media
University of Lincoln
Brayford Pool, Lincoln, UK
Friday, 2 July, 2010
{final deadline 21 May}
This one-day symposium is designed to showcase papers and presentations addressing or demonstrating the issues raised by practice-based research or pedagogy. While the theme of the seminar is ‘Media and Imagination’ , delegates are also invited to address any topic of concern to the media production curriculum, or to those who deliver and research it. The seminar will allow for screening and presentations of work in progress or completed by delegates or by their students as well as the presentation of papers.

Further details: www.lincoln.ac.uk/conferences

The deadline for proposals for papers and screenings/presentations on Media and Imagination is Monday 26 April

Please send an abstract of not more than 250 words (for a 20 minute presentation) to conferences@lincoln.ac.uk

Telephone enquiries to Kerry Swarbrooke +44 (0) 1522 886039

The deadline for proposals for other papers and screenings/presentations is Friday 21 May. {Details are as above.}

Conference Fee: £50 (£25 concessions)
The Journal of Media Practice is published by Intellect  www.intellectbooks.co.uk

Source: http://www.lincoln.ac.uk/home/conferences/jmp/index.htm

International Vocal Arts Workshop, Jeunesses Musicales Croatia

Call for Papers
Acousticity: A Symposium on Sound, Space, and Practice
International Vocal Arts Workshop, Jeunesses Musicales Croatia
June 13, 2010: Grožnjan, Croatia

Submit abstracts of 300 words or less to acousticity.symposium@gmail.com, by May 3, 2010.

Music takes place in the body, in the mind, in performance halls, in
villages, in nations: Music takes place in spaces. This symposium invites
participants to consider the spaces where we sing, play, and listen to
music. We will explore the ways music occupies space, and the ways space
changes and shapes music.  During the International Vocal Arts Workshop,
musicians grapple concretely with issues of music and space—experimmenting
with voice production, staging street theatre, and occupying various
rehearsal and performance venues throughout Grožnjan. The symposium will
provide a forum to reflect, theorize, and describe these and other musical
activities. We welcome papers from a variety of disciplines including
Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Theatre, Performance Studies, Anthropology,
Literature, History, Sociology, Psychology, Cognitive Science, Physics,
Anatomy. Topics may include, but are not limited to:

   Body, voice production and instrument-making
   Movement of music, music in exile
   Musical spaces (concert halls, recording studios, public space)
   Imaginary spaces, psychology
   Reception of music and voice
   Music on the page, on the stage
   Disembodied sound, music technologies
   Communities, political spaces, gendered spaces
   Grožnjan
   Spatial metaphors in vocal instruction
   Composition practices, structure and form, architecture
   Sound waves, circles of fifths, and other shapes in music
   Physics of space and sound, acoustics
   Music of the spheres
   “Balkanization† of sounds
   Performance and sexuality, identity, resistance
   Soundscapes and musical maps
   Silence and anechoic space

Symposium Coordinator: Anne Donlon (Graduate Center & John Jay College, City
University of New York)
Program Director: Jane McMahan (Barnard College, Columbia University)

Source: http://www.ecrea.eu

TaPRA Conference 2010

6th Annual Conference 9-11 September 2010

Cardiff School of Creative & Cultural Industries
University of Glamorgan

CALL FOR PAPERS & CONTRIBUTIONS

Working Group on New Technologies for Theatre & Performance

THEME: Accessing New Technologies for Performance
For the 2010 TaPRA Conference from 9-11 September at the University of
Glamorgan, the New Technologies for the Theatre and Performance Working
Group invites papers and presentations exploring the theme “Accessing
New Technologies for Performance”.
The digital age has brought an unprecedented plethora of new
presentation systems into the field of live performance. We are
calling for proposals on practice and/or theory based research that
consider issues surrounding the training of performance makers in
dealing with “new” technologies.
Following on from the interim TaPRA symposium organized by the New
Technologies for Theatre & Performance at the University of Sheffield on
the 8th of May, we would like to probe deeper into the following questions:

–       What precisely do we mean by new technology for theatre &
        performance in the 21st Century?

–       When performing with technologies do we inevitably become
        technology-led?

–       Does the inclusion of technology act to exclude women?

–       Do we need open our discrete discipline bound courses in order
        to allow more collaboration with the sciences in order to teach and/or
        do research more successfully?

–       Do we need more magicians in theatre schools?

     
We are also open to any other suggestion in relation to the selected
theme.
Please send a 250 word abstract/proposal, a short biographical
statement, and an outline of technical requirements by 30 April 2010 to
the working group conveners: Mary Oliver ( M.Oliver@salford.ac.uk ), Toni
Sant ( T.Sant@hull.ac.uk) and Carmen Szabo ( C.Szabo@sheffield.ac.uk ).

Participants in the May 2010 symposium should send in a separate
proposal if they would like to continue engaging with the theme in more
depth at the September conference. This is an open invitation and seek
to broaden the debate on this theme beyond the May symposium.

Papers should take the form of 20 minute presentations followed by
discussion.
 
Practice or performance-based proposals are welcome, as long as they
engage thematically and rigorously with the working group theme, but
these must be achievable with limited resources and within 20-30
minutes.

The New Technologies working group welcomes participants who do not wish
to present a paper this year but would like to attend and contribute to
the discussions; please contact the conveners by email upon conference
registration to confirm your participation. 

Further details about the TaPRA available at http://www.tapra.org

Source: t.sant@hull.ac.uk